Cape Verde

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Republic of Cape Verde

The Republic of Cape Verde (República de Cabo Verde) were reputedly uninhabited prior to being colonized by Portugal in the 15th century. During that period, the islands became an important part of the slave trade, and were a target for infrequent from pirates and other European nations. After the decline of the slave trade, Cape Verde became an important commercial center and resupply stopover. During the 1950s, growing nationalism and a desire for independence spawned the creation of the Partido Africano da Independência da Guiné e Cabo Verde or PAIGC (African Party for the Independence of Guinea and Cape Verde), which waged a guerilla campaign against the Portuguese in the mainland colony of Portuguese Guinea. Yet the insurgency did not disrupt life on Cape Verde. The nation eased into its independent status, which was officially granted in July of 1975.

The Partido Africano da Independência de Cabo Verde (PAICV) or African Party for the Independence of Cape Verde was created in 1980 as a response to a coup in Guinea-Bissau, and ruled the nation as a one-party state until 1990. Growing political pressure, however, brought about multi-party elections in September 1990, which the nation has retained ever since.

The People's Revolutionary Armed Forces (FARP) of Cape Verde has been a small force of 1200 personnel, divided into the Army and Coast Guard. The FARP is in the process of being restructured, with the Army scheduled to be replaced by a National Guard consisting of three branches: Military Police, Naval Infantry, and an Infantry Battalion.

Camouflage Patterns of Cape Verde

  • The FARP have worn a Chinese-made copy of the French lizard camouflage since at least the early part of the 21st century. Although replaced in favor of other patterns by some units of the armed forces in recent years, many, including the Marine Corps (Fuzilieros Navais), continue to wear this camouflage pattern.

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  • More recently, some military personnel have been documented wearing a copy of the French CE woodland camouflage pattern.

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  • A faithful copy of the Brazilian Marines lizard camouflage design is worn by some units of the Army, including the small component of Paraquedista (paratroops).

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  • It is also believed some personnel are wearing the Portuguese DPM pattern in limited numbers, although photographic evidence remains scant.

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